Sunday, March 18, 2012

The Ferrari FF (2012)

The Ferrari FF (FF meaning "Ferrari Four", for four seats and four-wheel drive) is a grand tourer presented by Ferrari on March 1, 2011 at the Geneva Motor Show. It is Ferrari's first production four-wheel drive model. The body style has been described as a shooting-brake, a type of sporting station wagon/estate car with two doors. It replaced the 612 Scaglietti grand tourer. The FF has a top speed of 335 km/h (208 mph) and it accelerates from zero to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 3.7 seconds. Ferrari states that the FF is the world's fastest four-seat automobile. The FF sells for $300,000 USD, with 800 being produced during the first year.

Class                     Grand tourer
Body style             3-door shooting-brake
Layout                   FM4 layout
Engine                   6.3 L V12
Transmission          7-speed dual-clutch
                              automated semi-automatic
Wheelbase             2,949 mm (116.1 in)
Length                   4,907 mm (193.2 in)
Width                    1,953 mm (76.9 in)
Height                    1,379 mm (54.3 in)
Curb weight           1,880 kg (4,145 lb)
Price                       $295,000

The new four-wheel drive system, engineered and patented by Ferrari, is called 4RM: it is around 50% lighter than a conventional system, and provides power intelligently to each of the four wheels as needed.[3] It only functions when the manettino dial on the steering wheel is in the "comfort" or "snow" positions, leaving the car most often in the traditional rear wheel drive layout.[10] This system is based around a second, simple, gearbox (gears and other components built by Carraro, taking power from the front of the engine. This gearbox (designated "power take off unit", or PTU) has only two forward gears (2nd and 4th) plus reverse (with gear ratios 6% taller than the corresponding ratios in the main gearbox), so the system is only active in 1st to 4th gears. The connection between this gearbox and each front wheel is via independent haldex-type clutches, without a differential.[11] Due to the difference in ratios "the clutches continually slip"[12] and only transmit, at most, 20% of the engine's torque. A detailed description of the system (based on a conversation with Roberto Fedeli, Ferrari's technical director) has been published.


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